St George's History

A very Short History of St George's Berlin

The first Anglican Church in Berlin, 
was an English Chapel in the hall 
of the North Gatehouse of Monbijou Palace 
(destroyed during WW2), opened on Whit Sunday 1855.

In 1855 the Princess Royal, 
Princess Victoria,
the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria 
married Frederick, 
the German Crown Prince. 
She worshipped in the English Chapel 
until 1885 when, 
as a Silver Wedding gift,
St George's was presented to her. 
The original location was at Oranienburger Strasse. 
Services were held there from its 
consecration on 21 November 1885 until 1939, 
with a brief interlude during the WW1.

In May 1944 it was severely damaged during a bombing raid.
After the war from 15 July 1945 services were held at various places.
It was from this time that St George's came under the responsibility 
of the Military Chaplain General. 

The foundation stone 
for the present St George's Church 
was laid on 3 May 1950.
It was dedicated by the Rt. Reverend George Ingle, 
Bishop of Fulham, on 9 December 1950.
On 20 December 1953 the then Lord Mayor 
(Governing Mayor) of Berlin, 
Dr. Walther Schreiber, 
handed over to the Bishop of Fulham, 
representing the Bishop of London, 
a contract granting the British Community in Berlin
the use of St George's Church 
for a period of 100 years. 

On 14 August 1994, 
St George's Anglican Church returned 
to the the Church of England's Diocese in Europe.
The Revd John Turner 
became the first 'non-military' priest since 1945. 
He arrived at the beginning of August 
and his inauguration was also on 14 August 1994.
After the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989) 
and since reunification of both German states (1990) 
the civilian congregation has been ever increasing 
and members of the congregation are not resticted to British subjectes, 
but the church welcomes followers 
of the Anglican or Episcopalian faith, 
or indeed any other Christian worshipper, 
regardless of their nationality.


After the sudden death of John Turner on 27 December 1997, 
Christopher Jage-Bowler became his successor.

The members of the congregation are roughly equal numbers 
of British, North American and German natives, 
other Europeans and smaller numbers of people 
from African and Asian countries and the rest of the world.